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Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization DNS-B

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization DNS-B
28 Feb

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization DNS-B reviewed
11/29/2011 BY JBROWNDC
I had the pleasure of visiting Athlete’s Performance Institute in Phoenix, AZ and attending Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization recently.
I won’t even try to fully capture the full scope of DNS in this blog. The system, developed by Dr. Pavel Kolar, is based in developmental neurology and applies the principles of turning and creeping into assessment of the core (integrated spine stabilization system) and phasic movement of the extremities. Understanding the anticipated movements of these inborn patterns allows us to perform resisted exercise or reflex locomotion to refresh these subcortical patterns to the standard operating procedures of cortical movement. For those versed in the traditional chiropractic model of treating the nervous system and the innate, you have not seen more evaluation and influence of the nervous system or innate abilities than you will find in DNS. This technique may very well be the bridge from the beginnings of our understanding to some of the contemporary developments and methods.

For those who wish to know more about DNS, follow this link.
A few key points:
Joint centration is essential and non-negotiable.
-positions can be modified as needed, but joint centration must remain.
– decentration of one joint will undoubtedly lead to decentration of another joint. (An undesirable chain reaction.)
What is centration? Centration is the position of maximal joint contact. This allows the most even distribution of forces through the joint as well as balanced muscular coactivation around the joint.
Why do we want centration? Maximal motor control and power with minimal load/stress.
Breathing and abdominal bracing (spine stabilization) are intimately related and are interdependent. Both must be maintained or the integrated spine stabilization system is compromised and stability is lost.
Evaluate and train in multiple positions/patterns. The ‘key link’ Janda described will be evident in multiple evaluations. Retraining this key link will require repetition and myelinization through training in multiple positions.
Newborns begin with primitive, reflexive patterns. With afferent input (stimulation) there are genetically preprogrammed movement patterns that develop at specific neurologic ages. Failure of proper neurologic development indicates a ‘central coordination disorder’ that may be indicative of CNS pathology.
“Form follows function”: failure to follow typical developmental movement patterns can have morphologic consequences. (ex. flat foot, acetabular angle, pelvic tilt, kyphosis, etc) Louis Sullivan coined this phrase in the world of architecture, but it clearly has its place and value in human development as well.
Zones of support during developmental positions create areas of dense proprioception. These areas can be used for stimulation during isometric exercise and reflex locomotion.
Tactile and/or verbal cuing is used when altered motor patterns are seen. When verbal or tactile cuing is not sufficient to improve faulty patterns, then reflex stimulation may be necessary.
During reflex locomotion there is a vector to follow, often towards the point of support (punctum fixum) or the next joint in a phasic limb. The vector is not a specific direction, but within a general region from the stimulation point. The exact vector is within a ‘cone shape’ and is determined by the clinician based on anticipatory reaction generated from stimulation.
There is a broad application of the principles of DNS as they are based on universal principles of inborn, preprogrammed movement patterns. Applications range from evaluating and treating developmentally challenged babies, to restoration of normal movement patterns in painful or restricted adults, to allowing maximal motor control and muscle activation in elite athletes. I should also mention that maximum distribution of joint forces is also applicable to all ages and situations as it will ensure proper development and maturation, help prevent future injury and joint pathology, and prolong athletic careers. This diverse applicability makes this system a valuable tool.

Dr. John Rusin Shoulder Pain

26 Feb

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW…

-Shoulder pain is climbing the ranks as one of the most common orthopedic conditions diagnosed and treated in today’s medical community.

-A combination of bad posture and the rise of hand held technologies can be to blame for this epidemic of shoulder, neck and upper back pain.

-The shoulder screw home mechanism (also known as shoulder packing) can position the shoulder in optimal position for functional exercise, even if your posture is less than stellar.

-The same setup position using shoulder packing can be used in every movement involving the upper body.

INTRODUCTION

Shoulder and upper back pain is one of the most common chief complaints I see on a daily basis from my patients as a performance physical therapist and soft tissue specialist. Regional shoulder pain is present in a majority of the population, no matter if you are throwing a baseball for a living, or working a 9-5 in your cubicle. In a current day society that is so highly dependent on handheld technology, our posture has become a serious risk factor to our orthopedic health.

SCREW HOME MECHANISM:

The screw home mechanism, also known as “packing the shoulder,” is the most centered position of the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) in the glenoid fossa (portion of the shoulder blade, think the socket). The ability for an individual to achieve true shoulder centration is made more difficult with the presence of a postural stress syndrome (PSS).

PSS is a form of chronic malalignment that causes soft tissues such as muscles and fascia to get fibrotic and shortened, ultimately weakening movements and limiting functional range of motion. With the inability for the shoulder and neck complex to move with efficiency through a useful range of motion, that region of the body will assume a “new neutral” position that negatively effects function.

This is where it gets tricky. Our new neutral position is not functional, and it actually increases our risk for injury if not negated before any movement integrating the upper quadrant (shoulder, upper back and neck complex). Our first option is obviously to correct the PSS with focused exercise and soft tissue work. That being said, people are going to train, even if they do sit at a desk 11 hours a day. The screw home mechanism activated stabilizers of the shoulder, and positions the shoulder in a neutral position before any pressing or loading movements.

Shoulder joint centration is a combination of external rotation of the glenohumeral (true shoulder) joint and depression, downward rotation and retraction of the scapulae (shoulder blade). Check out this video where I demonstrate a bad position (hike the shoulder upward) then center the shoulder with the screw home mechanism:

SAME SETUP- DIFFERENT POSITION:

The same screw home mechanism can be used at the shoulder joint to protect your shoulders, and align the joint for maximal force output and functionality no matter what upper body exercise you are completing. The screw home can be used in closed chain and open chain positions of the upper extremities (push up or press for example), and isolated holds or dynamic activities. Different angles and body setup applies, but the centration of the shoulder joint stays the same. Here’s some examples of ways to incorporate the shoulder screw home into your training:

RKC Plank Iso-Hold (Closed Chain/ Iso-Hold)

The plank…AH! I cannot tell you how many times I see this amazing activation and pillar stability exercise get absolutely butchered! The planks function is to train your postural stabilizers against gravity. The plank needs to be functional to translate into better compound lifts, and I can say without a doubt that the 3 minute plank you are doing in yoga isn’t translating very well! Focus on quality of movement instead of the quantity of time that you are holding. Max out your tension by squeezing every single muscle in your chain. If you are doing this exercise at the correct intensity, 8-15 seconds should have your gasping for air, and burning in places you didn’t know existed.

Key Coaching Cues: Use a slightly posterior pelvic tilt on your setup. It will get the anterior core more involved, and position your glutes for maximal tension! See my ass up in the air slightly? That’s where you need to be.

Push Up Iso-Hold (Closed Chain / Iso-Hold)

Same rules apply as the RKC Plank Iso-Hold. You are going to get those shoulders packed while de-weighted, activate your core, and squeeze with everything you got. This is a slightly more advanced variation of the RKC Plank due to having to control both your elbow and wrist joints in a static neutral position.

Key Coaching Cues: Drop the ass down just a little from the RKC Plank position. Maintain a neutral position at the spine and pelvis, creating a straight line ankles through the spine.

Push Up (Closed Chain / Dynamic )

Let’s take this one step further. Setup is going to be the same as the Push Up Iso-Hold, but we are going to add a dynamic pressing component into the movement. While maintaining the strong core and pelvic position, control the eccentric portion of the push up down to the ground with neutral shoulder alignment. Use a pause at the bottom of the motion to recruit shoulder stabilizers and minimize momentum. Once again, press up and get your elbows straightened out. While in the push up hold position, build tension once again for 1-2 seconds before completing your next rep.

Key Coaching Cues: The Push Up is all about core activation. We aren’t trying to half ass our way through 65 unbroken presses, we are activating stabilizers, and pressing for functionality and translation into more advanced loaded pressing movements. And for anyone out there who can complete 65 unbroken push-ups in a correct movement pattern, I’d like to see it.

Single Arm Kettlebell Shoulder Pack (Open Chain / Iso-Hold)

While in a standing position, our core must always be activated to maintain a spinal and pelvic neutral position. From this stable base, we are able to use our upper quadrant more effectively, and with more efficiency in movement. During the shoulder pack, swing the KB up to shoulder height. Maintain this static position with the core and shoulder girdle musculature firing at maximal tension.

Key Coaching Cues: Once the bell is up at shoulder level, make sure to cue a neutral rib down position. I like doing this with my opposite hand. Adds some tactile cues and keeps you honest when holding for max time and effort. Also, emphasize external rotation of the shoulder to set screw home. I OVER-emphasize this in the video to make the action clear.

Single Arm Kettlebell Overhead Iso-Hold (Open Chain / Iso-Hold)

The next step up from the Shoulder Pack Iso-Hold is getting the elbow and wrist involved. The more joints you are put in charge of from a stability and motor control aspect, the more difficult the movement becomes. From the shoulder packed position, press the bell overhead. Initiate the screw home mechanism in the overhead position. Hold for prescribed time with the biceps approximating the side of your head.

Key Coaching Cues: The hand position is the easiest way to make sure you are loading the shoulder correctly and centrating the joint. In a correct position, your palm will be facing away from you. With multiple joints involved, cue from proximal to distal to make sure you cover all your bases.

Single Arm Dumbbell Bench Press (Open Chain / Dynamic)

We made it back to the bench! Even though meatheads may disagree, all the same setup rules for shoulder packing still apply. Using a pronated grip, press the dumbbell vertically while maintaining a shoulder packed position.

Key Coaching Points: Shoulder stability on the bench is all about rhythm. For most clients, I cue a exp-1-2 rhythm. Accelerate the weight up vertically in a controlled manor, build maximal tension at the apex of the movement, and eccentrically control the weight down for 2 seconds. This will increase your TUT (time under tension) and deliver a greater training effect.

Single Arm Neutral Grip Dumbbell Bench Press (Open Chain / Dynamic)

Same Setup as the pronated grip press. We are using a neutral grip position in this pressing variation to help centrate the shoulder joint from start to finish. The neutral grip forces us to externally rotate the shoulders throughout the movement. If you are struggling with the traditional dumbbell bench press, a neutral grip may be a great variation for you. Also, any shoulder issues or past injuries, learning how to correctly position and press from this variation is a great option.

Key Coaching Cues: Maintain a constant angle between your upper arm and body. AKA don’t flare the elbows. Just because your hands are still in neutral doesn’t mean your upper extremity maintains the same position.

Seated Single Arm Neutral Dumbbell Overhead Press (Open Chain / Dynamic)

The seated position challenges the core in a very direct manor. Compensations from the pelvis are no longer able to be achieved due to being flexed at the hips, throwing all the core stability forces through the abdominal cavity and back. Make sure to maintain a rib down position and co-contraction of the anterior and posterior core. Squeeze for maximal force and tension through the core, and move weight vertically with stable shoulder position.

Key Coaching Cues: Posteriorly rotate your pelvis in a seated position to lock in your lower spine and activate your core. This position will keep you from overarching your lower back, and losing stability farther up in the kinetic chain.

CONCLUSION:

Combat your daily posture by taking action in self myo-fascial release and corrective exercises. While your working on loosening up those muscles, make sure you are still training, and training hard! Protect your shoulders by improving your alignment and setup with the shoulder screw home mechanism. Get ‘em packed before movement occurs, and maintain that optimal position throughout the movement.

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HAWTHORN PARK | THE ENCORE NYC FITNESS CENTER

HAWTHORN PARK | THE ENCORE NYC FITNESS CENTER
21 Feb

Sign Up!!! Schedule your 15-20 minute orientation and receive a tour of the fitness center this appointment give you quick guideline on how to use fitness equipment properly and safely protocol.

In addition all tenants will receive (30MIN) complimentary personal training session.
All services and training rates upon availability.

Monday – Saturday (By appointment only)

STAY COMMITTED AND GET BACK YOUR FITNESS LEVEL!!

STAY COMMITTED AND GET BACK YOUR  FITNESS LEVEL!!
21 Feb

Can you relate to this scenario? After putting it off for too long, you commit to get fit—only to find yourself injured the minute you start working out.

All of the sudden your fitness goals go back on the shelf and you are left to deal with the pain.

Whether your injury occurs right off the bat or after years of regular workouts the result is always the same. It is discouraging, painful and downright depressing.

And since studies suggest that up to 38% of all exercisers suffer from an injury each year, it is a subject worth exploring.

Top 3 Workout Injuries
The following three ailments occur commonly among active people. Let’s explore the cause of each and then detail your very own injury prevention plan—because let’s face it, you simply don’t have time to spend nursing and injury (and losing all that progress you had made).

1. Strain / Pulled Muscle: occurs when a tendon (connects muscle to bone) or muscle is stretched or torn. If you suffer from a strain you will feel pain and swelling in the muscle belly, or loss of function if the strain occurred in a tendon. Many strains occur as the result of an improper warm-up and insufficient stretching.

2. Sprain: occurs when a ligament (connects bone to bone) is stretched or torn. While this can happen to any ligament in your body, the most common placements of sprains are in the ankle, wrist and knee. Often this injury will happen suddenly as the ligament is stretched beyond its normal limit, usually during a fall or other acute trauma.

3. Low Back Pain: it is said that 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point in their lives—and the list of causes is as diverse as the sufferers themselves. Here are the main reasons for workout related back pain:

Improper form: Similar to bad posture, using improper form while performing weight bearing exercises will leave your back sore and aching. The good news is that once your form is corrected this pain should subside after a healing period.
Weak muscles: If you have a desk job then chances are your deep back muscles are inactive and unconditioned. When you start an exercise program, but fail to properly strengthen these muscles, the result is often an aching back.
Strained muscles: Not to pick on that desk job, but another result of sitting all day is tight back muscles. When these muscles are not properly warmed up and stretched before exercise begins, muscle strains occur.
Your 5-Step Injury Prevention Plan
Injuries don’t have to slow you from meeting your fitness goals. The following 5 steps will dramatically reduce your chance of injury and if you do find yourself injured, but have been following these 5 steps, your recovery will be quick and efficient.

Step 1: Stretch
What is more boring than stretching? You want to exercise, not sit around touching your toes—right? Even though it isn’t exciting, stretching is the best way to increase muscle elasticity and durability. Tight muscles are big contributors to strains—remember? Take the time to stretch everyday before and after your workout to stave off injury.

Step 2: Warm Up
Preparing for your workout should not begin and end with putting on your gym clothes. Your muscles need to be coaxed into motion by way of a 10-15 minute warm up in order to prepare them for injury-free use. Cold muscles are less elastic and are therefore more prone to tears.

Step 3: Proper Gear
For most fitness enthusiasts proper gear has everything to do with their shoes. Don’t be fooled—not just any shoe will do. Find shoes that offer support and traction for your exercise of choice, and make sure that they aren’t too tight or too loose. If you are prone to ankle injuries then try a pair of high-tops for extra support.

Step 4: Lifestyle
Stop for a moment and think about your car—if you don’t maintain it with regular tune ups, oil changes and quality fuel then you can’t expect it to perform well on the road. The same applies to your body. Getting healthy amounts of sleep, eating well balanced meals and staying hydrated will all contribute to your performance during exercise. The healthier your lifestyle is the less likely you are to suffer an injury.

Step 5: Condition
This may seem like the most obvious step to injury prevention, but unfortunately it is the most overlooked. People who keep their bodies in top condition by exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy lifestyle are the least likely to injure themselves. When exercise programs are started and stopped sporadically your muscles are most likely to become injured.

Of course being conditioned also has another great benefit that everyone enjoys – you get to look and feel great! And who doesn’t what that, right?

The ultimate injury prevention plan is to work with me, your qualified fitness expert! Together we will explore proper technique and will craft a plan for your unique fitness goals.

WELCOME TO FREQUENCY FITNESS NYC!!!

WELCOME TO FREQUENCY FITNESS NYC!!!
21 Feb

Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. Aristotle

NYT Travel Bans in Place as Northeast Braces for Blizzard

NYT Travel Bans in Place as Northeast Braces for Blizzard
21 Feb

Millions of residents in the Northeast braced for a powerful blizzard set to sweep across the region, states announced travel bans and the suspension or reduction of public transit, thousands of flights were grounded, and officials urged people to leave work early before heavy snow and high winds would make travel treacherous

NYT A Scourge Is Spreading. M.T.A.’s Cure? Dude, Close Your Legs.

NYT A Scourge Is Spreading. M.T.A.’s Cure? Dude, Close Your Legs.
19 Feb

It is the bane of many female subway riders. It is a scourge tracked on blogs and on Twitter.
And it has a name almost as distasteful as the practice itself.It is manspreading, the lay-it-all-out sitting style that more than a few men see as their inalienable underground right. Now passengers who consider such inelegant male posture as infringing on their sensibilities — not to mention their share of subway space — have a new ally: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

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