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Angioplasty or bypass surgery?

Angioplasty or bypass surgery?
23 Mar

Published: April, 2008

For many people, choosing one or the other is a toss-up.

Angioplasty or bypass surgery? Which is best when cholesterol-laden plaque narrows a coronary artery and chokes off blood flow to part of the heart muscle?

There’s no simple answer. It depends a lot on your situation: how many arteries are blocked, where the blockages are, your overall health, and your preferences. It also depends on how you define “best” “” most durable, shortest recovery, fewest complications, or longest survival.

At first glance, angioplasty with stent placement seems to be a clear winner. It requires a small nick in the groin, local anesthesia, an overnight hospital stay, and a relatively rapid recovery. In comparison, bypass surgery requires opening the chest, general anesthesia, a several-day hospital stay, and weeks of sometimes painful recovery. These differences are one reason why nearly 1.3 million angioplasties were performed in 2007 in the United States alone, compared with 470,000 bypass surgeries. On the other hand, surgery is the king of the hill when it comes to durability and freedom from chest pain. Far fewer people need a repeat procedure after bypass surgery than angioplasty. 

How to preserve your posture

How to preserve your posture
13 Mar

Harvard Women’s Health Watch
Published: June, 2006
There’s no cure for Parkinson’s disease, but new treatments can ease the symptoms and prolong independence.

“You’ll be fine for years. Go out and do your job.”

That’s how Janet Reno, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at age 57, recalls her neurologist’s advice. She took it to heart, not only returning to her demanding job as U.S. Attorney General but also taking up kayaking.

Reno and about a million others in the United States and Canada are living with PD, a progressive disorder caused by a loss of brain cells that produce the chemical messenger dopamine, most noticeably in an area of the brain that controls movement. For now, there’s no cure, but advances in treatment have made it easier for Reno and others to remain active for many years. Physicians are also increasingly recognizing that dopamine-producing nerve cells can be disturbed in brain areas other than those involved in motor control — and even outside the brain — which helps explain a host of mysterious symptoms that can accompany the disorder (see “More than a movement disorder”).

After the diagnosis: Living with Parkinson’s

After the diagnosis: Living with Parkinson’s
13 Mar

Harvard Women’s Health
There’s no cure for Parkinson’s disease, but new treatments can ease the symptoms and prolong independence.

“You’ll be fine for years. Go out and do your job.”

That’s how Janet Reno, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at age 57, recalls her neurologist’s advice. She took it to heart, not only returning to her demanding job as U.S. Attorney General but also taking up kayaking.

Reno and about a million others in the United States and Canada are living with PD, a progressive disorder caused by a loss of brain cells that produce the chemical messenger dopamine, most noticeably in an area of the brain that controls movement. For now, there’s no cure, but advances in treatment have made it easier for Reno and others to remain active for many years. Physicians are also increasingly recognizing that dopamine-producing nerve cells can be disturbed in brain areas other than those involved in motor control — and even outside the brain — which helps explain a host of mysterious symptoms that can accompany the disorder (see “More than a movement disorder”).

How to Make Your Running Shoes Last Longer

How to Make Your Running Shoes Last Longer
01 Mar

By Christine Luf
It’s important to replace your running shoes every 300 to 400 miles, but getting new shoes every couple of months can get expensive. But the better you take care of your running shoes, the longer they’ll last. Although they may be your most comfortable pair of shoes, don’t wear your running shoes for anything other than running or working out. Even if you’re just walking around, you’re still wearing out the cushioning. You’re also exposing them to more sweat, dirt, bacteria and funguswith every extra hour on your feet. All of those will take a toll on the condition of the shoe upper and insole. 

Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age

Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age
01 Mar

American Heart Association
Summary: Regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life.

The network of blood vessels (collateral circulation) shrinks in number and diameter as the brain ages. Collateral circulation allows blood flow to be rerouted when arteries narrow. Using mice, researchers found that this loss of collateral vessels is prevented by exercise, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017. 

Athlete’s foot: Take these precautions to reduce your chances of catching it

Athlete’s foot: Take these precautions to reduce your chances of catching it
17 Feb

Despite the name, athlete’s foot can happen to anyone. It is a common fungal infection that most people get from walking barefoot in moist public places like a swimming pool deck or locker room. Athlete’s foot can result in flaky skin, cracking and itchiness on the soles of the foot and between the toes. A new article outlines ways to avoid catching the fungus, from wearing flip flops at the pool to alternating the shoes you wear every day.

Surf Simply.com

Surf Simply.com
15 Feb

“Probably the most profound thing about my week was, how much this experience has reminded me of what’s important. I didn’t have a family and I work full time, sort of gotten away from all the things that power me and make me tick. And so being here has…., it’s been sort of life changing I have to say. It makes me want to return to all the things that make me happy and strong… and so yeah …I cannot tell you how much this week has reminded me of the important stuff. I promise to act on it, not just feel it in this moment. I want to come back stronger next year, build on all the things that have happened here . I’m deeply grateful.” – Rochelle

Fist bumping beats germ-spreading handshake

Fist bumping beats germ-spreading handshake
11 Feb

Science Daily
Elsevier
“Fist bumping” transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a new study.

“Fist bumping” transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

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