How We Do It: Dealing With MS Setbacks

How We Do It: Dealing With MS Setbacks
10 Nov

 Health Union Editorial: Team Living with MS is like being on a roller coaster. Things are going okay. You’re managing. Getting through each day. And then – BAM! Your life is thrown for a loop. Perhaps it’s another flare. Or a new symptom pops up. Or something about your MS changes unexpectedly. It can be devastating to feel as though all the progress you’ve made is wiped away in an instant. Starting over again…and again…can be so incredibly hard, both physically and emotionally. We asked our MultipleSclerosis.net community how they cope with MS setbacks. Here’s what they shared. READ MORE

Immune system keeps the intestinal flora in balance

Immune system keeps the intestinal flora in balance
02 Nov

Trillions of benign bacteria live in the intestine. They are kept in a continuous balance by the immune system, which thereby makes them harmless to humans. Researchers have been able to show how certain natural antibodies keep these bacteria in check. The findings could make an important contribution to the development of superior vaccines. The bacteria living in the intestine consist of some 500 to 1000 different species. They make up what is known as the intestinal flora, which plays a key role in digestion and prevents infections. Unlike pathogens that invade from the outside, they are harmless and tolerated by the immune system. The way in which the human immune system manages to maintain this delicate balance in the intestine largely remains unknown. It is known that type A immunoglobulins, referred to as IgA antibodies, play an important role. These natural defense substances are part of the immune system, and recognize an exogenous pathogen very specifically according to the lock-and-key principle. READ MORE

Research shows exercise-related proteins can suppress tumor growth

Research shows exercise-related proteins can suppress tumor growth
02 Nov

Forget bedrest, research from Edith Cowan University (ECU) has shown exercise may be a key weapon in cancer patients’ battle against the disease. Exercise causes muscles to secrete proteins called myokines into our blood — and researchers from ECU’s Exercise Medicine Research Institute have learned these myokines can suppress tumour growth and even help actively fight cancerous cells. A clinical trial saw obese prostate cancer patients undergo regular exercise training for 12 weeks, giving blood samples before and after the exercise program. READ MORE

Prior training can accelerate muscle growth even after extended idleness

Prior training can accelerate muscle growth even after extended idleness
18 Oct

University of Arkansas Summary: Skeletal muscles in mice appear to ‘remember’ prior training, aiding muscle growth and adaptability when retrained through exercise. According to a report by the American Psychological Association published in February 2021, 42% of American adults reported unintended weight gain since the COVID-19 pandemic began, averaging about 29 pounds.

For those who are still struggling to get back on track with their exercise routine, there is encouraging news: new research from the University of Arkansas indicates that prior training of muscles can accelerate muscle growth and response even after extended idleness. Getting back what was lost is likely easier than most people realize. READ MORE

It’s never too late to get active

It’s never too late to get active
18 Oct

European Society of Cardiology. A study in more than 30,000 heart patients shows that becoming active later in life can be nearly as beneficial to survival as continued activity. These encouraging findings highlight how patients with coronary heart disease may benefit by preserving or adopting a physically active lifestyle,” said study author Dr. Nathalia Gonzalez of the University of Bern, Switzerland.

Regular physical activity is advised for patients with heart disease, but recommendations are largely based on studies that used either a single assessment or an average of activity levels assessed over time. However, patients may modify the amount of exercise they do, and it remains unclear whether these changes are related to survival. READ MORE

Genes play key role in exercise outcomes

Genes play key role in exercise outcomes
17 Oct

Anglia Ruskin University Summary: A new study has found that genes can explain up to 72% of the difference in outcome between people after a specific fitness exercise. The research involved data from 3,012 adults and has identified a number of specific genes which influence the outcomes of different physical activities.

The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE and led by experts from the Cambridge Centre for Sport & Exercise Sciences at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) in England, found that up to 72% of the difference between people in performance outcome following a specific exercise can be due to genetic differences. The scientists analysed results from 3,012 adults aged between 18-55 — who had not previously taken part in exercise training — to determine how our genes can affect three important types of physical exercise. READ MORE

People with stroke who walk 30 minutes per day may have 54% lower risk of early death

People with stroke who walk 30 minutes per day may have 54% lower risk of early death
17 Oct

American Academy of Neurology Summary: A new study shows that people who walk or garden at least three to four hours per week, or bike at least two to three hours per week, or the equivalent after having a stroke may have a 54% lower risk of early death from any cause. The study found the most benefit for younger stroke survivors. When people under the age of 75 exercised at least that amount, their risk of early death was reduced by 80%

A new study shows that people who walk or garden at least three to four hours per week, or bike at least two to three hours per week, or the equivalent after having a stroke may have a 54% lower risk of death from any cause. The research is published in the August 11, 2021, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found the most benefit for younger stroke survivors. When people under the age of 75 exercised at least that amount, their risk of death was reduced by 80%. READ MORE

Community Views: Advice for Those Newly Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s

Community Views: Advice for Those Newly Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s
30 Oct

Health Union

Learning that you have Alzheimer’s disease may lead to anxiety, worry, and fear. After all, it is hard to know what to do next. It can be scary and overwhelming to consider your future with this diagnosis, but as several community members suggested, all you have to do is take it 1 day at a time. To learn more about how our community members learned to adjust to life with this diagnosis, we reached out to followers of our Facebook page and asked: “What advice would you give someone just diagnosed with Alzheimer’s?”  
More than 70 community members responded, and here is what was shared.